Grievance and guilt drive radicalisation

Grievance, guilt and capability drive violent radicalisation, hate preacher Abu Hamza has said.


The radical cleric, who is being held in the maximum-security Belmarsh prison in Woolwich, south-east London, said British foreign policy was a key reason behind radicalisation.

Hamza, 53, who was jailed for seven years in February 2006 for inciting murder and race hate, spoke to MPs from the jail as he fights extradition to the United States on terror charges.

Members of the Commons Home Affairs Select Committee visited Hamza at the prison on November 28 last year.

Their report on the roots of violent radicalisation said: “Abu Hamza believed the drivers of radicalisation to be grievance, guilt and capability.
”Grievances were driven by British foreign policy (relating to Palestine and Afghanistan) and a sense that the Prophet was being mocked.”
It went on: “He did not believe that unemployment was a source of grievance, and considered that groups who suggested it was were ‘blackmailing’ the Government for funding.

”Guilt was driven by a feeling that you were safe but your brother was not and you could not help him.”

The report also said that Hamza denied that his sermons contributed to radicalisation.

”He believed it was enough for people to watch the news to be radicalised and in any case he condemned the ‘wrong kind of violence’, where third parties were injured or killed,” it said.

”He told Muslims to express their grievances and guilt through lobbying, donating money and educating people.”

The report went on: “In terms of radicalisation in prisons, Mr Abu Hamza noted that prisons were a good environment for contemplation and that it was usual for prisoners to seek to re-evaluate their lives.”